Aviation safety
British Airways to relax rules on electronic devices
Thursday, 27 June 2013 08:12

british-airwaysBritish Airways is to become the first European airline to let passengers switch on their mobile phones and other devices just after landing.

From 1 July, once an aircraft has got off the runway people can power up their electronics, rather than having to wait until it has stopped.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has said it is satisfied there are no safety implications.

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NTSB issues amateur-built aircraft safety recommendations
Sunday, 09 June 2013 00:00

ntsb-issues-amateur-built-aircraft-safety-recommendationsFrom right, NTSB Director of the Office of Research and Engineering Joseph Kolly, and safety analysts Vern Ellingstad, and Loren Groff, present their findings on experimental and amateur-built aircraft to the National Transportation Safety Board on May 22.

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Why we have to turn electronic devices off on planes
Thursday, 06 June 2013 08:25

why-we-have-to-turn-electronic-devices-off-on-planesMobile phones and other gadgets could interfere with sensitive electronic systems, some theories suggest. So why is it still so difficult to prove the truth behind the claims?

I have a guilty secret to confess. My plane was preparing for take-off from London’s Heathrow Airport in March when a flight attendant made the usual request for passengers to turn their electronic devices off.

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Is an iPad Really Cockpit Friendly?
Friday, 03 May 2013 18:05

Francois LassaleFlight operations specialist François Lassale, managing director of Vortex FSM, has cast doubt on the wisdom of pilots’ depending on iPads in the cockpit. “Some operators are so caught up in iPad fever they’re not thinking about the complexities the units add to flight operations when they’re used in the cockpit,” he told AIN.

“I think the FAA and EASA have been caught off guard and simply rushed to catch up,” Lassale noted, warning that “the unit’s simplicity means training on the iPad and its use in the cockpit is seldom given much thought.” In his view, that means crews could be playing with the unit when they should be paying attention elsewhere in the cockpit.

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Proposal to ban 121.5 MHz emergency locator transmitters opposed
Monday, 08 April 2013 11:19

ELTSThe Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) has told the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) that it vigorously opposes the commission’s plan to prohibit the future use of emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) that use a 121.5 MHz signal.

The proposal will have a negative impact on aviation safety and AOPA told the FCC it should immediately abandon its proposed rule changes and defer to the FAA on matters of aviation safety.

ELTs using the 121.5 MHz frequency are estimated to be installed in more than 200,000 general aviation aircraft. In the event of an accident, these devices transmit a distress signal on a radio frequency to alert air traffic control and other nearby aircraft to the location of the distressed aircraft.

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Safety at the core: How human factors influenced aircraft maintenance training
Friday, 29 March 2013 13:53

FL Technics TrainingAt its heart, aircraft maintenance is a complex interface between machine components and the trained professionals who service them. It is only fitting then that reducing the scope of errors that coincides with such a system would be a topical concern for industry players across the world. Indeed, whether it be through engineering advancements or changes in industry oversight, there is no doubting the vast improvements to aviation safety that have taken place over the years. However, behind the complexities of aircraft maintenance lays a single linchpin – the human.

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Man gets 30 months in prison for shining laser at plane
Thursday, 28 March 2013 17:21

The shining of lasers at planes is a growing problemA 19-year-old California man has been sentenced to two and a half years in prison for shining a laser pointer at two aircraft.

In March 2012 Adam Gardenhire aimed a green laser pen at a business jet and then shone it at a Pasadena police helicopter sent to find the source.

He is the second person in the US to be sentenced for aiming a laser at an aircraft.

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Operating Into a Non-Towered Airport? Tips and Tools Are Available
Tuesday, 26 March 2013 13:32

towered airportAs the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) considers the need to close approximately 170 air traffic control towers in the coming weeks due to budget sequestration, some business aviation pilots may find themselves in a circumstance that they've trained for time and again, yet may also find unfamiliar: operating to and from busy airports they’ve flown to hundreds of times before, but now without an operational tower. 

When the tower closes at a controlled field, the airspace surrounding that airport may revert to either Class E to the surface, Class G airspace, or a combination of the two – usually with a Class E Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) corridor down to 700 feet above ground level, with Class G underlying to the surface. Specific procedures for each airport are listed in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airport/Facility Directory, or A/FD.

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TSA to phase out Rapiscan 'naked scanners'
Friday, 25 January 2013 11:02

The low-level x-ray machines also raised health concerns

The US aviation security agency will stop screening travelers with scanners that show travelers' naked images, amid widespread privacy complaints.

Scanner maker Rapiscan had been ordered to make its software function without screeners having to view naked images.

But Rapiscan was to be unable to meet a June deadline to make the updates, the US Transportation Security Administration (TSA) said.

The kit is to be replaced with scanners that show hidden objects on an avatar.

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Top Japan airlines ground Boeing 787s after emergency
Wednesday, 16 January 2013 11:07

Top Japan airlines ground Boeing 787s after emergency

Japan's two main airlines have grounded their Boeing 787 Dreamliners after one was forced to make an emergency landing because of battery problems.

All Nippon Airways (ANA) grounded its fleet of 17 Dreamliners when its flight NH 692 from Yamaguchi Ube was forced to land shortly after take-off.

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